Best Tips For Traveling Safely In Delhi

Traveling safely in Delhi with our driver

We lived for 2 years in India incident free (well apart from that guy who liked staring at me rather than the road in Chennai, and the bunch of guys at the local mall who wouldn’t leave me alone, and the rickshaw drivers who looked like they were going to eat me with their eyes…) But, ever since Nirbhaya (Jyoti Singh) was raped in a moving bus and dumped from it in Delhi (not far from our house) India has gotten its fair share of bad press for the safety of women. I have to admit, that Nirbhaya also altered my feeling of safety, and the way I conducted myself. Up until then I felt very safe, and was even a bit lax on my personal safety. After Nirbhaya I was very vigilant. Here are some of my best tips for traveling safely in Delhi,  including ones we were given by locals.

Rikshaw New Delhi

1. Get a local SIM card

At the airport you can easily pick up a local SIM card. This not only means that you can more cost effectively call people in India, but you have an Indian number with which to book taxis. You can’t book with local cab companies without an Indian phone number, and this leaves you with less reputable cab companies and flagging down cars and rickshaws.

2. Take a reputable cab company to travel safely

In Delhi, Easy Cabs (+91-11-43434343) and Meru Cabs (+91-11-44224422) are a good choice, although the drivers will rarely speak very good English. You will need to get someone at your hotel (the doorman can normally do this for you) to tell them where you need to go, and give them directions on how to get there. Do expect that they will turn up a bit late (getting stuck in Delhi traffic is a fact of life) so make sure you order them for half an hour earlier than you actually need them.

3. Or take a daily car rental

For daily car rentals, Swift has reliable drivers, and you can ask them for a driver who speaks English. (+91-11-48055555) Swift Car Rental. Swift is not only available in Delhi, but also in 17 other cities of India (I can’t guarantee English speaking drivers in all the other cities though).

Anand our driver in the rear view mirror, New Delhi, India

We used them for 6 weeks when we moved to India, always without incident. While the English of the drivers won’t be perfect, it was always good enough to be able to explain to them (in simple language) where we wanted to go, and when they should be back to pick us up. If you do take this option, then make sure you have a local SIM card, and take the number of the driver. They will go away while you have your lunch, and you will need to be able to call them to come back and get you.

4. Take a photo of the number plate

This is something I had never considered before moving to India, but it was advice that many people were very insistent on. In fact my boss insisted that I SMS him the number plate each time I was collected from the airport when I traveled. Taking the photograph means that he is aware that you are vigilant, and probably also that you know someone else to send it to. One of the best tips for traveling safely in Delhi.

5. Listen to your instincts, but don’t go overboard

If you feel uncomfortable in the car, then pull out your cellphone and make a call – even if it is only to the hotel you are traveling to – so that it appears that you know people and are being looked after. I was once in a car in Chennai and the driver had his rear view mirror trained on me. He spent more time looking at me than at the road. I started giving him instructions on how to drive, and called one of the guys where I was going to inform him that we were not far away so that the driver knew I was being expected. It was enough to get his eyes back on the road.

6. Don’t take a cab on your own at night

Unless you hire a multi-day driver from Swift and are confident in your driver, it is best to avoid traveling at night on your own. Get someone to drop you off at your hotel, accompany you to your hotel before traveling on to their own, or take dinner in your hotel. I created a lot of concern by driving myself in India, but I preferred to drive myself or use my own driver at night rather than take a cab. (I don’t recommend you drive yourself on a visit, the traffic is a real experience…)

Women's arm showing through a van window, Delhi, India

7. If you are traveling from city to city, book a car to collect you

The craziest part of travel in India is often the rugby scrum for a rickshaw or taxi as you step out of the train station or the airport. You can save a lot of hassle by booking a car in advance to collect you – they will hold up a name board – and having a destination hotel for your city of arrival. This saves you getting caught by touts (who earn a commission on the hotel they take you to) and ending up with a driver you don’t feel comfortable with.

8. Take the ladies section

The Delhi Metro is rightly the pride of Delhi, but “eve teasing” as it is known in India is a little too prevalent. If you are à woman traveling alone, them avoid this by taking the ladies only carriage.

Avoid the buses. The safety record of the green buses is appalling (they run over too many pedestrians) and you are unlikely to be helped if “eve teasing” starts on the buses. Stick to the metro and taxi’s of you are traveling alone.

9. Take a sense of humour with you

Travel in India is an adventure, in so many senses of the word. So many things are not as you expect, and approaching it with a healthy sense of humour will get you through so many situations. Don’t mention that you are just visiting, fake being an expat, say “challo” if you want someone to go away, and enjoy the ride of wonderful, crazy, magical India!

Genevieve Tearle has a passion for food and travel and loves to write about it. Do you want to read more about her stories or healthy food recipes you can visit her website Garlic and Lime.

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